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Hours

7.2 / 10

(based on 11 ratings in 2016)

2016

"When work is urgent there is obviously very little the firm can do in terms of flexibility, but when the deal is over there is a high chance of being given some extra time off, which is much appreciated."
Second year trainee, London
"Where you have an urgent need to leave, the team is generally quite flexible about accommodating this, provided that there is someone to cover your work."
Second year trainee, London
"Some nights can be very long, but in comparison to other firms of the same calibre they are reasonable. This is something associates have access to, for example they can have a day off after a closing."
First year trainee, London
"Hours can be tough, but as I am working in an advisory department, partners tend to respect personal plans. They also highly appreciate weekend work. Holidays are very rarely interrupted, and other colleagues will do their best to cover for you."
London
"No point denying it, hours are long. But the type of work that we do is extremely interesting and you do not even realise how quickly they go by. The teams are all friendly and great to work with, so it also makes the long hours enjoyable."
First year trainee, London

2015

"The firm is flexible regarding hours, so long as you give plenty of warning beforehand as to your unavailability. Otherwise it is expected that you will be able to stay most evenings."
First year trainee, London
"I sometimes need to work late, but if I have an important event I usually can get out without there being an issue!"
Second year trainee, London
"Unsurprisingly, hours can be fairly long, although this will vary wildly according to department. Finance and M&A are obviously going to be quite long, whereas being in an advisory seat will, on the whole, mean you get to enjoy at least some of your evenings."
First year trainee, London
"Sometimes the hours can be long (especially in the transactional seats) but that really goes with the territory. Also, there is no 'face-time' culture, so if you have finished all of your work you can leave."
First year trainee, London
"Hours in transactional seats fluctuate hugely. I have worked until anywhere between 5:30pm to 5:30am. There is no facetime culture though; if you can leave at 5:30pm, you leave."
First year trainee, London
"Having fewer trainees and lawyers working on each project means the demand is greater for hours, which is often not ideal. However, teams are generally understanding of instances where you should not be expected to work so long, and are generally appreciative of extra hours put in."
First year trainee, London
"Depends very much on the department. You generally have more flexibility regarding time management if you're doing an advisory seat as transactional work is more demanding and time-constrained."
First year trainee, London
"Transactional departments are very inflexible whereas advisory departments are more flexible. Hours vary enormously between departments and depending on which deals you are staffed on."
Second year trainee, London

2014

"No 'face-time' concept, but expected to put in the hours required to get the job done. There is no average number of hours per week - it varies enormously depending on what deals you are working on."
First year trainee, London
"Hours are not very flexible - when there's work (which there always is) it can be tough. Lack of 'face-time' moves it up a few points though."
Second year trainee, London
"The hours can be long, but where possible you are given warning and people are flexible if you have important events to attend. From speaking with friends at other firms, the stigma of US firms working longer hours doesn't seem to be a fair representation any more - if anything, friends at UK firms have worked longer hours and over longer periods of time."
Second year trainee, London
"Working hours can be lengthy and, therefore, demanding but no more than would be expected at a firm with the profile and clients that this firm possesses. Trainees are always encouraged to leave during quieter times at the earliest opportunity and supervisors do take an active role in managing their trainees workloads and working hours."
First year trainee, London
"The hours can be long but normally you're doing proper work, you won't be kept late for the mundane stuff unless it's absolutely essential. Supervisors are generally really good at being clear on deadlines where this is possible. The firm has always been flexible with me when I have had special requests on flexibility."
First year trainee, London
"The nature of the work the firm does means that hours can sometimes be inflexible, that being said when we are quiet there is no 'face-time' culture. Your supervisor will be keen to get you out early when this is possible."
First year trainee, London
"Where at all possible, people are flexible. There is a good relationship amongst the trainees, and so within your department (and sometimes even outside of the department) trainees have in the past volunteered to do the work originally allocated to another trainee in order to let them make an engagement."
Second year trainee, London
"The firm is very flexible. When you are quiet, it is absolutely expected that you leave at 5:30pm and take time for lunches/coffees. Obviously when a deal is closing you will stay late, but if you have something like a family event or theatre tickets they are very flexible and happy for another trainee to cover if possible."
First year trainee, London

2013

"No one usually leaves before 6/6:30pm at the earliest. Hours can vary upwards from that to anything."
First year trainee, London
"I spend far too much time in the office - I billed over 2500 hours last year."
1 yr PQE,
"The hours depend on the rhythms of the matter you are working on. Given the nature of the work we do, this means they can be difficult. I would not say they were worse than anywhere else, however, and you get strange looks if people catch you in the office when you could have left."
Second year trainee, London
"Have had a few weeks of very little time spent outside the office but the way in which trainees are quite involved in transactions from the outset means that these times can be anticipated in advance. My experience so far is that there is no 'face-time' mentality here."
First year trainee, London
"There is no 'face-time' culture and people expect you to leave if you have no work to do. Also, systems are in place to enable us to work from home. The only negative thing about the hours is unpredictability."
First year trainee, London
"My first seat has been pretty good hours-wise, although this does vary quite a lot between departments."
First year trainee, London
"In the run up to a closing, the hours can be very long, but that aside they're very reasonable. When there's a chance to get away early we are encouraged to take it."
First year trainee, London
"They can be very unpredictable, and at times you could have nothing to do all afternoon and have something land on your desk at 6:00pm. People obviously try to avoid this, but it's expected in this sort of job. When it is crunch time, hours can be bad, but if there is a lull, no one expects you to hang around for the sake of it and you are encouraged to leave early while you can!"
Second year trainee, London
Our 'Inside Buzz' reviews are the comments and views of recent graduate recruits, giving you a view of what it may be like to work for an organisation. Copyright of all TARGETjobs Inside Buzz material lies solely with GTI Media.
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