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Check out our new expert advice on equality and diversity

Are you keen to find work with an employer that takes a positive approach to equality and diversity? Are you concerned about potential discrimination when you apply for graduate jobs? If you have a disability, when should you disclose information about it to a recruiter? What if you have a criminal record – is anybody out there who will give you a chance?

It’s not always easy to find out what your legal rights are, or to know exactly what to look for when you’re trying to find an employer that will offer you the working culture you want. That’s why we’re delighted to announce our partnership with AGCAS, the Association of Graduate Careers Advisory Services, which means we can now bring you their excellent advice on equality and diversity issues in graduate job hunting.

AGCAS is the professional organisation that represents university careers advisers, so reading through their content hosted on targetjobs.co.uk is the next best thing to having your own personal careers adviser to hand. Here are some common questions about equality and diversity: we’ve supplied you with brief answers, and you’ll find more details in the AGCAS equality and diversity section on targetjobs.co.uk.

Q. Do employers expect you to include your date of birth on your CV?

A. No. You don’t need to disclose how old you are on your CV. Many employers no longer ask for your date of birth, age or dates of employment and education on application forms.

Q. If you have a disability, are you legally obliged to disclose it?

A. No. It’s for you to choose if and when you disclose. If you do tell an employer about your disability you are protected by the Equality Act 2010. This means the employer must take all reasonable steps to provide any necessary adjustments and mustn't discriminate against you because of your disability.

Q. If you have a criminal conviction, do you always have to disclose it to employers, regardless of the nature of the job you are applying for?

A. No. Criminal convictions become ‘spent’ after a certain period of time, which varies depending on the sentence for the offence. After this time, you don’t need to disclose your conviction to a prospective employer.

However, there are some important exceptions to this rule, depending on the sentence you were given and the nature of the work you are applying for. You must disclose convictions, even if they are spent, if you are applying for work that involves contact with disabled, elderly or mentally ill people, or under 18s. This also applies to some professional roles, including lawyers, teachers, medics, nurses and social workers.

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