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Set designers are responsible for creating sets for use in the production of films, television programmes, plays and musicals.

Sometimes set designers take on responsibility for the entire visual aesthetic of a performance as 'production designers'.

What does a set designer do? Typical employers | Qualifications and training | Key skills

A set designer is in charge of designing and creating the sets that appear in films and television programmes as well as in the theatre. The role involves working with and communicating with directors, producers, costume designers and other members of staff.  

Typical responsibilities include:

  • reading scripts
  • producing plans, drawings and models of sets
  • preparing estimates of set costs
  • managing budgets
  • viewing possible outside broadcast sites
  • planning
  • attending rehearsals/film takes
  • meeting with and commissioning set construction companies.

Typical employers of set designers

  • Theatres
  • Film and video production companies
  • Terrestrial, satellite, digital, cable and independent television companies
  • Advertising agencies
  • Music video production companies

Experienced designers (particularly film set designers) commonly work on a self-employed/freelance basis.

Vacancies are advertised online, in national newspapers and in specialist publications including The Stage newspaper, Broadcast, The Knowledge and Screen International as well as their online equivalents.

Qualifications and training required

Although there are routes into this profession for both university graduates and school leavers, employers will prefer candidates with degrees in theatre studies, creative arts, performing arts, drama, fine arts, visual arts, graphic design, 3D design, illustration, architecture or landscape architecture.

The ability to demonstrate a genuine interest in, knowledge of and experience of visual arts, television, film or theatre is essential, and often more important than academic qualifications.

Job shadowing and unpaid/vacation work experience can be helpful. It is essential to make speculative applications – directories such as KFTV and Kays Production Manual contain useful contact information.

To find out how to get into a career in this area via a school leaver route, visit the media section of TARGETcareers, our website aimed at school leavers.

Key skills

  • Stamina
  • Creativity
  • Enthusiasm
  • Determination
  • Perseverance
  • Imagination
  • Adaptability
  • Working well under pressure
  • Good spatial awareness
  • Technical skills

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